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In This Podcast

Dee Dee

502 Hemp Founder and CEO

Dee Dee started 502 Hemp to educate and support her community with Kentucky hemp products. Her high standard with compassion has been noticed by communities and organizations with various awards. She continues to grow and partners with local companies to cultivate a wellness atmosphere. Learn the full story of 502 Hemp and Dee Dee Taylor.

Matt

502 Hemp Business Director and Co-Owner

Matt became interested in CBD when his arthritis became so inhibiting it threatened to end his athletic career. After taking CBD he noticed a dramatic improvement, not only arthritic inflammation, but also muscle soreness and overall demeanor. The decreased inflammation allowed Matt to resume his athletic training and train longer than before. Observing these improvements, Matt knew that CBD was an industry to be involved in. He wanted to share this amazing product with as many people as possible. Once Dee Dee and Matt became acquainted they became the perfect match for a dream team operation.

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Introduction

Matt:
Hi, I’m Matt

Dee Dee:
And I’m Dee Dee. We are the hilarious outcome of opposing brains sharing a mutual desire to share knowledge and positivity when thinking about hemp and cannabis.

Matt:
We are here to tear down the walls built by big pharma and other big companies that seek to keep the human race and fear divided.

Dee Dee:
We are here to shatter the myths about hemp and cannabis and change the stigma of this amazing plant. Welcome to Hemp and Happiness with the hemp queen.

Matt:
And emperor.

Dee Dee:
Podcast. Join us as we venture into this misunderstood and the unknown.

Welcome

Dee Dee:
Hey, happy hamsters. It’s so great to, uh, be back in the studio. We had a little, a little little break, uh, you know, summer’s just starting and it’s so pretty out. So we like to get out and enjoy things, but we are back with a brand new edition. Oh, wait, was that a song? It was <laugh>.

Matt:
I thought that was a band.

Dee Dee:
It was a band <laugh> and I think there was a song too, but anyway, thank you for joining us again and make sure you’re following us on, you know, all the channels, cuz I think we’re on every single one of ’em and if you have questions, send us an email info 5 0 2 hemp.com and maybe we can answer it on the show. So keep that in mind. We got an interesting topic today. Um, Matt and I have been doing some, I don’t know, just some deep level stuff on what’s going on in today’s world, as far as climate issues go. And I’m gonna let you take over Matt,

Matt:
Take over

Dee Dee:
<laugh> you always do. Anyway. That’s a

Matt:
Dangerous proposition.

Dee Dee:
I know. And I just put my 2 cents in when it’s needed.

Matt:
Um, yeah, so I, I’m gonna try to keep this as funny as I can today, cuz we gotta go over some kind of serious topics. Um, so we all I think are aware of global warming at this point, if you’re not, uh, go outside and you will notice, uh, that the temperature is four to five degrees Fahrenheit or 1.5 degrees Celsius warmer than it was the year before. Um, and that’s not just a natural occurring thing that is human, uh, in introduced by, by humans, uh, with our release of what is referred to as greenhouse gases. And again, I’m sorry if this is kind of rudimentary, I’m gonna do like a real quick, uh, kind of synopsis of greenhouse gas, which traps in, uh, the heat that is brought about by the sun does not allow it to escape warms our earth. That is mostly in the form of carbon dioxide.

Matt:
Also known as CO2. This has started about 200 years ago with something called the industrial revolution. The industrial revolution is when the United States and Europe began industrializing. That means making things on a mass scale, using machinery, uh, engaging things like electricity and therefore, uh, a fuel source, uh, to perpetuate that, which up to this point has been primarily something called fossil fuels. Fossil fuels are fuels mine from the earth that are the result of carbonized decaying matter. We are all made of carbon and that carbon breaks down gets trapped. It creates, uh, these fuels over millions of years,

Dee Dee:
Millions of

Matt:
Years. Millions of years. Yes. So that in turn,

Dee Dee:
How long are we on

Matt:
This earth is behind? Well that’s subject to debate in this, uh, podcast. <laugh> it is. Uh, so when that started happening, um, we started changing the landscape of the planet. I know at first we didn’t realize it, uh, but it, it, it started changing and in that two main components that are affecting us, as well as our ecosystem, that we, by the way rely on to survive. Uh, so this, I don’t wanna have a, I don’t, I don’t want this to be a doomsday podcast, but some of this stuff is actually quite serious guys. There’s

Dee Dee:
Some people that really don’t believe any of it, Matt.

Matt:
Yeah. Well, if you don’t, like I said, go outside. Um,

Dee Dee:
They still don’t

Matt:
Believe it. Get in your car and drive to the beach. They think it’s just normal. Um, make a, make a mental landscape of where the ocean is at high tide and low tide go back the same time next year, you will see the difference. Um, it is that dramatic at this point and that real. Um, so anyway, the result of the greenhouse gases is the warming of the earth, uh, the melting of the polar ice caps and the rising of the ocean. Now that may seem like the worst problem ’em <laugh>, but it’s actually not. Um, it, that that is a, a severe problem and a, a big problem, especially for certain islands in the Caribbean that do not, uh, get that much above sea level. And, uh, and the next 50 years could actually be underwater like Atlanta style craziness. And

Dee Dee:
They’ve, they’ve talked about Florida being underwater.

Matt:
So, well, I, I don’t know. I, I don’t know that that, that statistic is true, but I do know that there are some, um, and by the way, anyone who wants to, uh, research this will have tons in the show notes, but I would also encourage you to get on the Noah website, uh, look at these models. Uh, they are models of, of projected future, uh, potential future, um, effects, uh, but it, some of them show entire islands now under underwater, uh, where people now live and will be displaced and, um, lose everything. And that is within our lifetime. I mean that, that’s how quickly this, this is accelerating. So with all that doom and gloom, I’m gonna give a little, the water world. Um, <laugh>

Dee Dee:
I

Matt:
Mean, honestly with,

Dee Dee:
Because I can’t stand boats, man, I get sick every time.

Matt:
Well, the good news, the good news Dee is before the whole world is underwater will already be dead. Okay. Because I

Dee Dee:
Mean, that’s a, the pull,

Matt:
Right? The, the, the more, the more, the more serious matter, um, that is largely not spoken of, uh, until recently is the acidification of the oceans. So what is happening, uh, along with this global warming is these greenhouse gases are combining with sea water. Okay. Mm-hmm <affirmative> so when the CO2 enters the atmosphere, you know, we, we think it, it, you know, gets absorbed by the trees and, and to some extent that’s true. Uh, but what in large happens about 70 to 80% of the carbon dioxide that’s released into the atmosphere is absorbed by our oceans. When the carbon dioxide combines with sea water, it creates a weak carbonic acid. Um, and we are obviously producing carbon, uh, dioxide at an exponentially increasing late rate. So as this continues, the oceans become more acidic. Um, we’ve already increased the ocean’s acidity by one and a half pH, um, which is enough to have severe effects. Okay. So I I’m, I’m gonna throw, throw this at you. CO2 is creating carbon acid that is settling in the oceans. And, um, if, if these statistics are off, please correct me because I am not a student of science. I am only a student of preservation of human life and, and happiness on this earth, but I know that these, most of these statistics are, are true though. They may be muddled. So just a kind of a disclaimer,

Dee Dee:
Well, let’s talk about CO2, cuz that’s naturally found mm-hmm <affirmative> in our atmosphere,

Matt:
Correct? Yes.

Dee Dee:
Correct. And it can be used for good,

Matt:
Well, CO2 is actually necessary. Okay. Because for

Dee Dee:
Just pointing that out, cuz you know, we use CO2 for an extraction process, man,

Matt:
And for, for photo and for photosynthesis to occur within plant life. Correct. Um, and coral CO2 is necessary and there’s a naturally occurring amount of CO2 that is necessary for life to exist. Right. There is also a tolerable amount of CO2 that we can produce, uh, that the earth can absorb. Correct. Okay. We’ve passed that. We, we, we actually surpassed that point in 2017.

Dee Dee:
Yes. And the reason we surpassed that too has a lot to do with the plant life and how it’s being destroyed in these ginormous rainforest for the timber.

Matt:
Okay. Right. So let me get to that. That is true. Mm-hmm <affirmative> but the plants okay. 70% of the carbon dioxide to oxygen conversion, mm-hmm <affirmative> occurs in the ocean.

Dee Dee:
Okay.

Matt:
Only 20 to 30% of that conversion happens on land. So all of the rainforest devastation’s terrible. Right, right. Horrible for it’s

Dee Dee:
Animals, everything horrible, horrible, horrible.

Matt:
But what we’re neglecting and what we don’t see is what actually absorbs that CO2 and makes oxygen for the vast majority of the oxygen on this planet. Mm-hmm <affirmative> is in the oceans.

Dee Dee:
Isn’t that crazy? Think

Matt:
It is it’s water. It is crazy. And H so we’re, so we’re warming it to the point where it is killing these plants and microbes that create the oxygen. Correct. And we’re also acidifying it to the point where these plants cannot survive. So essentially what we’re doing is we’re creating an unbreathable, chemical and eliminating the only thing on the planet that can absorb it. Yep. And convert it there actual

Dee Dee:
Coral reefs that are completely being destroyed. Yes. And they’re trying to bring that ecosystem back to life by artificial means I just watched a special on this. My husband watch lots of

Matt:
Stuff there there’s

Dee Dee:
There’s it was, I mean, that’s freaking incredible and it’s scary and sad at the same time.

Matt:
Yes. So there’s actually only one reef in north America that still exists and it’s off the coast of Florida. Um, and it is about six between 60 and 70% decimated. So already over halfway dead. Um, and there there’s another, uh, a graph from, from Noah, which I would encourage you all to look at that shows it being gone somewhere between 20, 30 and 2050. Yeah. Uh, completely. So

Dee Dee:
Y’all, that’s not that far away.

Matt:
We really, this is, this is reached mission critical, uh, to all the listeners out there we are, we are at a point where, where we are officially as of 2017, at a point where we are expending resources that we cannot get back. Mm-hmm <affirmative> uh, no matter what we do and it’s not going, it’s not getting smaller, it’s getting larger. Yep. Uh, so, you know, I’ve got a, a ton of stuff here I can read off, but we can get more into that. What I do want to talk about is what we can do to change it and fix it because I refuse to believe that the human race is at a point where we’re all doomed and we’re all gonna die and it’s too late. Um, I do think that there are a lot of people out there that don’t care. I think that there are a lot of companies out there that don’t care because of natural greed.

Dee Dee:
Um, well, I mean, a lot of the EPA regulations were lax, um, and pollution and all that stuff has increased

Matt:
Well, but it doesn’t matter. You can sit here and talk about the EPA all day long and you’d be right. But there are entire nations yes. With no EPA, very true. Who we are more than happy to buy these products from. So why, who cares about the EPA? Well, just get it from that’s very country a or country B who has no EPA.

Dee Dee:
Yeah. And they really don’t

Matt:
Care about the, the environment. Right. It’s it, their

Dee Dee:
Third world and just trying to survive. That

Matt:
Makes sense. And that’s the mindset. Oh, it’s another country. It’s not our problem. Mm-hmm <affirmative> okay. This is a global issue. The, there is no borders in the ocean. There is no borders around, oh, there’s plenty of oxygen here. When the oxygen runs out, we, we all die. It doesn’t matter what country you live in. Whether can you create it in a lab, whether you are, uh, yeah, actually it can be lab created.

Dee Dee:
There’s there. I saw this cartoon at one point in time. There’s literally the man has an oxygen mask with the one tree that’s left.

Matt:
<laugh> do

Dee Dee:
You know what I mean? Well, and you’re trying to keep that one tree alive so you can stay alive too and breed the oxygen. It produces. I mean, it’s it, it’s scary, sad. I think that there are things that we all can do to help. Yes. I think there’s things that you and I, as an organization with 5 0 2 hemp that we try to do to help. Um, there’s so many things there.

Matt:
I agree. I agree. And, and really, I, I mean, let me just kind of reel myself back here. Uh,

Dee Dee:
He does like it,

Matt:
We, we can, we can do a lot as a comp as companies, we can do a lot as individuals. Um, but what, what, again, and again, here’s the buzzword, it, it, it’s gonna require independent thinking, right. Because, because the reality is when you walk outside and you have a safe living and relatively safe living environment, which a lot of people in the United States, do you have a car, you have a job, you have security. You’re not really thinking about much else. Right, right. Oh, it’s okay. Today. It’s okay today. Um, it’s starting to not be okay today. Uh, and the increase of storms, the disappearance of coastlines, um, and the disappearance of sea life, um, especially shell sea life. Um, I is, is just becoming glaringly apparent. So anyway, I just wanna, before we get too far down the rabbit, hold talk about a few different things that we can do.

Dee Dee:
Um, well we do know him truly does make a big difference in our ecosystem

Matt:
And I bring it home. I’m gonna talk about that. We’re gonna talk about that. So the, the easiest way, uh, for us all, both as companies and as individuals, uh, to help this situation, and I’m talking of the, I think 20 tons of carbon dioxide that the average, uh, human produces a year bringing that down to like eight, um, can, can happen, um, with disposable items, right? Mm-hmm <affirmative> so that was a big turning point, uh, in the industrial revolution. Again, I’m, I’m, it’s not a F four hour podcast, so I can’t walk you through the indu industrial revolution, but somewhere around the 1950s, uh, the United States and then the rest of the world, uh, entered the disposable era. Um, we have, you know, I’m gonna go ahead and call out the B company. Although I don’t think that they know what they knew, what they were doing at the time. Um, for this,

Dee Dee:
I don’t think most companies did

Matt:
It started, it started with depo, disposable pens, then mm-hmm <affirmative> then disposable lighters, uh, was clicker B. Then it became flicker Bick. And honestly, after those two campaigns, uh, they were like, we are onto something. And the big company I think owned by, I’m not gonna say who they were owned by. Cause I don’t wanna misquote, uh, decided to become a disposable company. Mm-hmm <affirmative>, uh, we are going to specialize in disposable items and the easiest resource and cheapest resource at that time. And even today was plastics. So the majority of our disposable items are made from plastics. Those plastics come from, uh, the petroleum industry and that fossil fuel industry that we cited earlier that is so responsible for, um, the greenhouse gases, these greenhouse gases and the CO2 go

Dee Dee:
Ahead. And that’s the petroleum jelly <laugh> I mean, it is a byproduct, you know that, right. Okay. And they tell you to use it for

Matt:
Everything. Yes. And you, here’s the thing <laugh> there, there, the petroleum industry has its place. Uh, and I don’t wanna just sit here and discredit the petroleum industry because there are huge benefits to plastics. Um, and there, there, there are plastics that are huge in

Dee Dee:
There are, but I think they could be made more biodegradable and use hemp products to do

Matt:
It with, let me, let me, let me get into that. Let me get into that. So, so yes. Um, that’s

Dee Dee:
The next company I wanna

Matt:
Own the, the real secret is, um, it’s not in plastics themselves. It’s the disposable plastics, correct that we use and we use them every day. Um, and then we think that they are just gonna disappear, but they’re not. And there’s only a few things that happen to them. One, um, their mind, uh, from, from the fossil fuels that emits greenhouse gases, they’re processed into polymers that polymer, uh, polymer, ation, whatever it’s called process emit greenhouse gases as they degrade, which primarily happens in landfills, they emit greenhouse gases. Okay. So just to put this into perspective, plastic was invented, uh, by Lou or I’m sorry, Leo bland, uh, in 1907. Okay. So not much more than a hundred years ago. Uh, plastic has literally reshaped the landscape of our earth in that hundred years. So put that into perspective. I mean, that’s that, that’s a, that’s a, not even a blink, even in human E evolution, uh, that’s made this huge difference.

Matt:
So tons of alternatives, which Dini and I are gonna discuss here in a minute, but before we do that, here’s, here’s what I’m gonna challenge you as a listener, listening to this, I would challenge you for the next two weeks. Every time you touch a piece of single use, disposable plastic, ask yourself, do I need this? Or is there an alternative that I could do, right. To not use this plastic and not even necessarily purchase this product? Uh, a lot of what we think we need isn’t necessarily what we need. Right. And I’m not gonna get too into that. Cause I don’t wanna disparage any products.

Dee Dee:
Yeah. But man, it’s hard. You go the grocery and everything’s filled with, I mean, plastic is everywhere, right? Everything. It’s horrible.

Matt:
I agree. But

Dee Dee:
We

Matt:
Recycle you can start well and here’s, here’s the thing, recycling is good. Um, less than 9% of the plastic that has been created has, has been recycled. Um, most of it ends up in landfills and the oceans are incinerated. And when it’s incinerated, that’s a big

Dee Dee:
Problem. It’s even worse. Yes. I mean, those gases, it creates from being incinerated is even worse.

Matt:
So take two weeks, ask yourself if there’s an alternative and then start engaging that. Start start using that in your lifestyle. I mean, how big of an inconvenience is it to bring your own bags to the grocery? How big of an inconvenience is it to use to buy milk and a paper container as opposed to a plastic container? Is there an alternative product to the PLA piece plastic in your hand that isn’t plastic? I mean, I bought bros last weekend, right? For a treat mm-hmm <affirmative> if huge, I know I was bad <laugh> you can, I mean, you can go, you can go to the deli, you can, you can buy plastic bra brots or you can, or you can go to the deli counter and get ’em wrapped in paper and they’re fresher and that’s true and better. And your taste better. And, and you know, we don’t, we, we we’re so wrapped up in the convenience because we’re trained to wrapped up to be wrapped up in that convenience because we’re sold on that, oh, this is gonna save you time. Well, time to do what, to work more, to do more, to buy more

Dee Dee:
And not leave an earth for your

Matt:
Family and your kids. And, and then there’s nothing grandkid. And then there’s nothing left. I mean, what are we doing? What are we saving all this time

Dee Dee:
For? Well that, you know what, Matt though, that that brings up something for me, because one thing that really bugs me and don’t get me wrong, I get it this whole, when you order something online and they put it in all this pretty packaging and it’s pretty, and it’s like this whole big reveal and they they’re doing it in CBD companies too. I’ve seen it. I’m just like what a waste. I can’t stand that. It irritates the bajes out of me because we get our products and boxes. We reuse those same boxes. Now have I had to buy some boxes, bigger sizes? Of course. But we, we try to reuse things that get shipped to us and reuse that for when we ship our products out. I’ve just, since I started this company that I’ve been all about that I cannot stand that packaging, that pretty packaging like Whoopie do die. You open it up and it’s pink paper or whatever. And it’s got this special, what that is just gonna go in the landfill into the trash. Are you gonna reuse that with somebody else’s logo on it? No, but you can take one of our boxes and reuse it for something. Right.

Dee Dee:
So that, that’s just always been one of my little pet peeves when, even when it comes to this industry too, cuz I see that all the time.

Matt:
Well it’s every industry because it is it it’s, we’ve really Mar

Dee Dee:
What’s that consumerism, right? Oh, you gotta market it to us and make it look Pret or we won’t wanna buy it. Why, why, why?

Matt:
Because that’s, that’s the culture we’ve

Dee Dee:
Created. I know. And it’s

Matt:
Insane. And, and arguably that’s the culture that the corporations we choose to worship overall, things have created with, with the branding, um, with, and don’t get me wrong and you, I, a student that branding,

Dee Dee:
I know we both are, we do our marketing, we do our branding, but at the same time, it’s like, that kind of stuff is ridiculous.

Matt:
Right. And, and we’re, we’re allowing ourselves to be led by, by these corporations, um, unwittingly without thought, um, to poisoning the very things that allow us to live. Um, you know, we’re, we’re, we’re so consumed right now with how much we’re, we’re loved and what people think us and how we’re identified and how we identify and how we interface with our reality and hypersensitive ultra tolerance. But there’s really no thought about what’s killing us. Right? We’re we’re we’re so we’re so hypersensitive not to step on each other’s toes, but we’re more than willing to buy products that are killing each other. Right. And killing ourselves without, without a second thought,

Dee Dee:
Let me buy from this company because it comes mailed to me in this pretty little package and I get to open it. And it’s pretty, that’s so dumb.

Matt:
Sorry. But without a thought, um, we’re being trained to lose sight of the, of the things that are really important to our survival. Mm-hmm <affirmative> not to how we feel, cuz guess what, when you’re dead, you’re not gonna feel much of anything. Yeah. Um, and neither our, our, our, the future of our, the future generations, uh, which won’t exist. Yeah. So, um, anyway, just to get back to the statistic that you were speaking of earlier, uh, since 1950, approximately 9.1 billion, tons of plastic has been produced, uh, 6.9 billion. Tons of that, uh, has become waste nine, uh, percent has be, has been recycled. Um, and the rest ends up in the landfills and the oceans.

Dee Dee:
I feel really bad about this pen right now in my

Matt:
Hand. So, uh, but here’s the thing go to pencils. Here’s the thing, there’s no point in feeling bad because we we’re, we’re all to blame. There is no, I’m not, I’m in, I’m in no position to shake my finger at anyone because I am as guilty as anyone. Right. We we’re, we all need to share in this. And, and, and there is no point in feeling guilty. There’s no point in feeling bad. There’s only a point in acknowledging the problem and doing what you can to fix it, doing what we can to fix it. And again, en engaging that thought, uh, that independent thought not, oh, I’m gonna buy this because I know this brand. And I saw this brand on TV. Yeah. Um,

Dee Dee:
Their boxes are pretty.

Matt:
Yeah. And I’m, I’m attracted to the packaging. Mm-hmm <affirmative> uh, so anyway, um,

Dee Dee:
Things we can do to

Matt:
Help yeah. Things we can do to help one, uh, the plastics, right. I, I, and, and by the way, I love these recyclable

Dee Dee:
Water bottles. Hello. That was a big scam, by the way, y’all them water bottles, such a

Matt:
Scam, recyclable wa uh, uh, containers are huge. Um, substituting glass products for plastic products is huge. Even when you recycle, uh, plastics, they’re still gonna give off carbon dioxide, all these organic, uh, alternatives. Now they’re doing, uh, polymer strands from starch, whe protein, uh, you know, different fuel corn, hemp, all of these things. That’s awesome. And that, that eliminates the CO2 emissions from the mining. But guess what it does not ish, uh, eliminate the CO2 emissions from the creation of the polymer and the breaking down of the polymer. Right? So, unfortunately, while that’s a better alternative, that’s really not the answer. Um, re uh, reusable shopping bags, which we already mentioned. Uh, there’s plastic additives out there that are, again, can be added to all different types of plastic that actually biodegrade the plastic, uh, that solves the landfill problem. Doesn’t solve the CO2 problem. Uh, they’re making plastics out of grape waste. They’re making, uh, there’s a really cool new product out now called liquid wood. Uh, I don’t know a ton about the application, but it’s made from, uh, excess wood fibers very easily could be made from hemp fiber, um, uh, great product, kind of new on the market,

Matt:
Versatile PHA, poly tyres, PLA poly poly. Styres all different phases of biodegradable. We actually need to be a little careful when we get into these biodegradable plastics, uh, because one of the major concerns and the major fight with these biodegradable plastics or plastics with biodegradable additives are that once, uh, they are added to the market, if they accidentally get into recycling, um, that could cause a major problem with recycled products that, uh, biodegrade, uh, prematurely and cause issues there. So that makes sense. Some thought process needs to go out there, but really reuse products and getting out of the disposable culture that we, that we’ve, uh, been in for the last 70 years. Yeah. Is going to, I think be key. I love what we’re doing with the, the, the solar panels wind panel, or, uh, um, I’m sorry. Uh, the turbines, wind turbines, huge stuff going on in there. Uh, we’re heading in the right D direction. What’s being ignored is, is our single use culture.

Dee Dee:
Right. Uh, and, and honestly, Matt, I mean, I know we’re not gonna really get into that. Um, but even electric cars, you know, there’s a lot of mining for that lithium that has to go on, and those batteries are not super biodegradable either. I think there needs to be an alternative to fuel as far as the fossil fuel goes. And I’m sure that’s coming along cuz biofuel. Um,

Matt:
But, well, I know

Dee Dee:
We, you and I both briefly discussed it here.

Matt:
Here’s the problem. I

Dee Dee:
Have to buy a whole new engine for him

Matt:
A again, when, when, when you use a biomass fuel, that’s great. You’re eliminating the mining process. You’re not eliminating the emissions. I know, unfortunately you’re still emitting the same shit. Riding our bikes into the air that you did. You got an electric car. That’s awesome. Where is that electricity coming from? Exactly. If it’s coming from a fossil fuel based plant, you are, um, you’re still contributing to the issue. You’re just offsetting it. I know. Which is unfortunate. And, but just to give you a statistic, I think, um, in, oh, I had it here and I lost it, but anyway, it happens. It it’s something like, uh, uh, in the next 10 years, uh, the, the emissions from plastic processing will be the equivalent of, of 295 brand new power plants up and running in the atmosphere, pumping, uh, pump pumping, uh, CO2.

Dee Dee:
I heard a statistic that zoom helped the environment more than anything else that we’ve done in the past. I don’t know, five or 10 years just by eliminating all these people driving two medians when they could just have it virtually online. I thought that was huge. I’m like way to go zoom that wasn’t even planned. That’s not even why they did it, but I mean, it makes sense to me, half the meetings you can have virtually. Mm. I like those. I get to sit at my desk and be comfortable. So, you know,

Matt:
Yes. And, and while I agree with that, I also think it’s, that’s important, but it’s also important to not lose sight of one another as a community. Mm-hmm, <affirmative>, uh, the bad thing that the COVID COVID blah, blah, blah, a bad thing that the COVID epidemic did, uh, to our, our world was one way push the single use culture, right. Because nobody wanted to reuse anything cuz it could have COVID. Uh, so we really got on the habit of using shit once, throwing it away. We were encouraged to do that. Um, most of those products by the way, were plastic. Um, we move to zoom. I agree. Uh, if you don’t have to travel, that’s great. Uh, especially for something as arbitrary as a, as a meeting, which let’s face it, most meetings in corporate America are bottom line driven and how can we make more money mm-hmm <affirmative> uh, which don’t get me wrong is necessary.

Matt:
We all need it to survive. Uh, but we can’t get lost in that. Uh, what we can get lost in is not communing with one another. And part of communing with one another is, is what makes us great human beings and what helps us share ideas. Uh, and I, I think that being in physical presence of, of one, another one is good for us psychologically it’s healthy. Um, it, it shows things about one another through body language and, and just closeness that you cannot get through a screen. Um, I’ll give you that. So I, I think there’s something to be said about that even though I think it’s really important, uh, to be conscious of the environment when it’s

Dee Dee:
Not necessarily, we always need to be conscious of conscientious of the environment.

Matt:
We just can’t lock ourselves in our basement or our office.

Dee Dee:
I could

Matt:
To do that. <laugh> it’s not healthy. Maybe not. It’s not, it’s not. And that’s what, and that’s where we lose sight, cuz that that’s where the

Dee Dee:
Yeah,

Matt:
The, we, we, we, we don’t engage independent thought and then we start listening to the media and then we’re consumed. Yep.

Dee Dee:
And we could talk about this topic for more than one episode and we may have to come back about it, but you know, just to wrap everything up guys, think, think before you use reuse it recycle, don’t buy from a company that just has pretty plastics for you to, um, an unwrap and UN Marvel. And you know, just think we gotta help save our generations, our future generations, our kids, kids maybe still have a world to live in that’s food for thought

Matt:
Well said, Dee de and, and please try that challenge go two weeks. Just think about it. Mm-hmm <affirmative> think about it. Think about what you can do differently to make that difference, uh, because every bit counts.

Dee Dee:
It really does. Thank y’all for listening. Always welcome your feedback. Keep an empty out there. Thanks for joining us for another episode of hemp and happiness with the hemp

Matt:
Queen and emperor.

Dee Dee:
Keep your mind ever open and expanding, like subscribe, review, follow us all the good stuff and

Matt:
Keep it hippy out there.