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In This Podcast

Dee Dee

502 Hemp Founder and CEO

Dee Dee started 502 Hemp to educate and support her community with Kentucky hemp products. Her high standard with compassion has been noticed by communities and organizations with various awards. She continues to grow and partners with local companies to cultivate a wellness atmosphere. Learn the full story of 502 Hemp and Dee Dee Taylor.

Matt

502 Hemp Business Director and Co-Owner

Matt became interested in CBD when his arthritis became so inhibiting it threatened to end his athletic career. After taking CBD he noticed a dramatic improvement, not only arthritic inflammation, but also muscle soreness and overall demeanor. The decreased inflammation allowed Matt to resume his athletic training and train longer than before. Observing these improvements, Matt knew that CBD was an industry to be involved in. He wanted to share this amazing product with as many people as possible. Once Dee Dee and Matt became acquainted they became the perfect match for a dream team operation.

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Introduction

Matt:
Hi, I’m Matt

Dee Dee:
And I’m Dee Dee. We are the hilarious outcome of opposing brains sharing a mutual desire to share knowledge and positivity when thinking about hemp and cannabis.

Matt:
We are here to tear down the walls built by big pharma and other big companies that seek to keep the human race and fear divided.

Dee Dee:
We are here to shatter the myths about hemp and cannabis and change the stigma of this amazing plant. Welcome to Hemp and Happiness with the hemp queen.

Matt:
And emperor.

Dee Dee:
Podcast. Join us as we venture into this misunderstood and the unknown.

Welcome

Dee Dee:
Hey, thanks everybody for joining us today. We’ve got an awesome guest. Uh, her name is Laura Hardy, also known as regular Laura, but I always like to call her fabulous Laura. Um, she, uh, you know, she used to live here in Louisville and she was one of our favorite favorite radio dish jockies. Is that what it’s called? Radio personalities? Um, on 1 0 7 7, the Eagles. So we miss her. She, uh, she moved on to greener pastures. <laugh> literally right Laura <laugh> so we’re, we’re super excited to have you on today. Um, Hey, tell us, tell us, tell us what, uh, what have you been up to?

Laura Hardy:
Well, in December I took a job in grand rapids, Michigan at a completely different kind of radio station. I was on 1 0 7, 7 Eagle there, Louisville, which is classic rock. Very fun, loved. It was very heartbroken to leave, but I’ve moved up here to grand rapids, Michigan to work for a station called mix 95 7. It’s a top 40 station. I’m a part of a big morning show called the big Joe show. And I’m having so much fun. I’m loving Michigan. As much as I miss my old Kentucky home. I’m missing Derby a little bit this week. Not gonna lie. Like I watching everybody have fun. I miss the bed races that I usually get to host last night. Just I, I I’m ready. I, I miss Kentucky, but I am loving Michigan for one very specific reason, which I think is why you guys brought me on. <laugh>

Dee Dee:
One of the reasons we wanted to have you on the show, miss Laura. So you’ve you first off, you have been such a huge fan since every well. I’m a huge fan of you, but ever since we actually met, you actually had C and I sent you a little care package. It’ just like, Hey, here’s some of this hint product stuff, try it out. I hope you feel better. You know, it’s just kind of one of those things, cuz first off, I didn’t want you to think I was a stalker or weird or wanting you to, uh, endorse our, my company, our company. But at the same time, I was like, man, you just need to try it. See if it helps you just give it a whirl. And then you and I became like instant friends after that. Yes, it was freaking awesome. And we still are, obviously, even though you left us, I’m sorry. <laugh> but no, you know, I love you. Um, but the cool thing is you have enjoyed and partake in the products that we do have here in Kentucky, which is mostly the Delta eight and some of the dispensary grade, uh, Delta nine products. But you tell me what’s it like living in Hmm. A legal state.

Laura Hardy:
Yeah. Uh, it’s crazy. Now, one of the things I have learned about Michigan itself is we are a little weird when it comes to legality. Like for example, say you wander over to Illinois. Mm-hmm <affirmative>, you know, there’s not as many dispensaries. They’re generally not near the state line. Um, it’s a little difficult to get to, like I know that the rise, the first rise you could get to in Illinois, if you were to go, just try some recreational stuff. If you decide you wanna cross state lines and do that activity. Um, I know the first rise in Illinois is like an hour into Illinois still. Okay. I think they may have opened a newer location since the last time I went. But so it’s like, it’s a huge whole thing here in Michigan. There is, and it’s because of like laws limiting how many dispensaries can exist in that state. And that’s how a lot of states are. Michigan has said go crazy open. As many as you want, put ’em wherever you want. As long as they’re not next to schools or businesses that that can’t have that kind of thing. Wow. And just really grow. And because of that, the boom has been insane. In fact, I did a bunch of research cuz I write articles and stuff up here for my current job. Mm-hmm <affirmative> in 2018 when marijuana was legalized in Michigan and ounce would cost you $500.

Dee Dee:
True.

Laura Hardy:
Last week during four 20, I bought an ounce four $60.

Dee Dee:
<laugh> wow.

Laura Hardy:
Yeah. That’s how big the population is. It’s not because they’re just, it’s cheap. It’s not good. Whatever. There’s such a big boom. And so much business prices have been lowered. You could buy, uh, edibles for $8 a bag here, sometimes less individual ones you could buy for two and $3. If you just want one, one till 10 milligram quickie, you could buy that for $2. That a lot of dispensaries here, pre-rolls somewhere between eight to $10. Generally I’ve seen ’em as low as six ounces as low as 70 to 80, up to much more. If you get some higher strain grades and then like during four 20, they were selling, uh, vape carts 10 for 110 for a hundred. So 10 bucks each and wow, it’s just crazy. And the cool thing about that is it’s not like it’s just like weeds everywhere, but the money that Michigan is made off of it alone, like you can say whatever you want about people smoking weed, all the stuff whatever’s going on there. One thing you cannot deny and can’t argue with is the fact that the state of Michigan last year made so much money. Each city for every dispensary they have, they get $53,000.

Dee Dee:
Wow. So

Laura Hardy:
If your city has four dispensaries, each one of those has just netted you $53,000 to work, to use in your community on R repairs, uh, upgrades to any sort of building schools, that kind of stuff. It doesn’t matter. That is your tax money to go in your city. So cities like grand rapids here are making tons of money off of this, even though the industry itself has made billions, they’ve made millions off of taxes. And now that they’ve had so much overages, they’re paying that back to the communities and it’s actually the, the marijuana industry is improving our communities hugely and, and offer, offering all these opportunities and jobs. There are more marijuana industry employees in the state of Michigan now than there are firefighters at this point

Dee Dee:
That is insane and incredible at the same time. Dang. Yeah. So why do you think that’s not happening here in Kentucky?

Laura Hardy:
I mean, I’m not in a place to get in trouble anymore, so I’ll say it out loud. It’s called bourbon <laugh>

Laura Hardy:
In my personal opinion, I think that the, the unfortunateness is that Kentucky has leaned hard on bourbon for a long time. And while it is a great tourist industry, there’s a lot of positives to it. People like drinking it. I think that unfortunately the nature of bourbon doesn’t raise as much money and it is holding other industries like hemp down because they do not want the competition. Now here in Michigan, the beer companies don’t seem to care, cuz I guess they figured that stuff goes hand in hand hops and hops, hops and hops and other sorts of, uh, grains. I guess they don’t mind as much. I don’t know what the deal is. But um, here in Michigan, they, they don’t have that big lobby fighting against them. And, and some of the, unfortunately the, the legislators here have been much more apt to it.

Laura Hardy:
Unlike Kentucky, who it seems like they’re just spinning their wheels to stop something that the entire state desperately wants. And so when Michigan put it on the ballot and voted it through, that’s what stopped it. But I know I’ve been watching the headlines in Kentucky and you guys are kind of in a Staal mate right now because some people wanna decide for everyone else when that’s not what they were voted in to do so. Right. It’s, it’s a very unfortunate thing you guys are going through. And it sucks to watch the difference between watching people and, and, and everybody thinks, you know, oh, there’s gonna be weed everywhere. People are gonna drive crazy. I see less accidents here. I see, uh, less people being drunk in the streets here. You don’t see that anymore. Mm-hmm <affirmative> like we don’t have raging alcoholic, you know, drunk people wandering the streets of grand rapids nearly like I saw on Louisville. Um, and, and, and there’s all sorts of pluses to it. And outside of just all the money it makes like you can’t argue the tax revenue alone is worth doing it. Cuz you’re just giving that money to other states. Every time someone crosses a state line goes to Illinois, you go to whatever, Ohio, Missouri, there’s other states that have at least medical. If not recreational, if you’re going there, we’re losing tax money. Every time someone crosses the state line and buys marijuana in a different state than Kentucky.

Dee Dee:
Yeah. Agreed. Agreed. Yeah. What do you think about that, Matt?

Matt:
Well, first of all, my apologies for those who see me walking the streets drunk, <laugh>, it’s just something that I like to do all you want. No shame. I try to keep it as clean as I can underwear on the inside of the pants, but there’s no guarantee. Oh man. First night. Yes. Yes. I’ve had a few <laugh>. So college, maybe with that being said, um, as always, I agree with you, Laura. I mean, we we’ve sat in the back office of our shop and, and had this very conversation and you know, there’s a lot more fucks and shits and involved usually when it’s just the two of us. Uh, but

Laura Hardy:
Try to keep it borderline professional for the nice

Matt:
Folks out there. <laugh> you do? You, you fucking do. You,

Dee Dee:
Did you, are you please tell me you’re going by the name of FA fabulous Laura. Instead

Laura Hardy:
I am. I’m just Laura Hardy up here. I, I wasn’t Laura.

Dee Dee:
Oh

Laura Hardy:
Good. Because there’s a big Joe. I feel like being regular, Laura felt weird or anything. Laura felt weird. So I was like, I’m just gonna drop the adjective. We’re gonna just be Laura here, which is it

Dee Dee:
Works

Laura Hardy:
Well. And you know, it’s, it’s been, it’s been great. I really, I really love this city. I love everything going and, and it’s just, it’s great. I love it. I, the four 20 here was the wildest thing ever because you know, you, you hear about everything. Like not only are the marijuana prices low. My friends and I made a game out of trying to find how much free stuff we could get. And I’m not talking about swag. Like there was a company called sensei. They’re a magazine. That’s cannabis based they’re nationwide. But they were really focusing on Michigan this year. If you went and bought like a small amount of stuff at certain stores, you got $300 worth of free marijuana products.

Dee Dee:
Wow.

Laura Hardy:
Free rolls gummies. I got a vape. I got a tenture I got pills. I got sugar like, like THC sugar that you could put in your coffee. Amazing dude, highly recommend

Dee Dee:
<laugh>

Laura Hardy:
And, and all sorts of this crazy stuff. And it’s like, that’s stuff you couldn’t do in a lot of places because of the fact that it’s it’s free. But it’s, if you go to, if I were to go down the street and go to the cereal store, I don’t know if there’s a cereal store. I’m just ne I have a box of cereal in front of me. That’s what I’m thinking of. If I go to the cereal store to buy a bunch of cereal, they give me something free, no big deal. But in a lot of places, you wouldn’t be able to get that free product after buying the first thing and Michigan said, nah, have all you want. So I probably got four, $150. I spent that day. I probably got $500 worth of marijuana

Dee Dee:
Every day road trip next year, Matt.

Matt:
Well, I’ll tell you, I dunno how many, I don’t know how many times I’ve dug into the bottom of a cereal box looking for a marijuana tree and it’s never there.

Dee Dee:
That’s usually after the

Matt:
Piece of plastic, that’s all it is

Dee Dee:
After you have a lot of marijuana. It’s the munchies you get. So you eat that whole damn box of cereal, the

Laura Hardy:
Box of cereal at that point.

Dee Dee:
That’s right. Oh man. Too funny. I I’ve just kind of wondered how your take has been on that with, I mean, I know the reason you do, the reason you partake in cannabis is because you are no longer drinking alcohol, right? You’ve been sober from alcohol for how long now?

Laura Hardy:
Two years, two years. Uh, I been, I stopped at the beginning of the pandemic, um, cuz it just my drinking habits weren’t healthy or good for me. Mm-hmm <affirmative> and not that I drank a lot, but when I did drink, I was bad at it. Yeah. So I just decided that wasn’t really a thing I should do for the two week. What I thought was a two week lockdown that turned into years, it felt like mm-hmm <affirmative> so I quit drinking and um, I I’ve always kind of micro used micro or marijuana in some sort for my anxiety because I I’m diagnosed with panic disorder and generalized anxiety. So I tend to be a very nervous person. So if I could take something to allow myself to come from here to here, it makes a world of difference in how I function. You know, it’s not always just a guilt going around being as stoned as humanly possible type of existence.

Laura Hardy:
Right? Sometimes it’s for me, I used to, to take melatonin to go to sleep and then I’d wake up in the morning. And with my early morning schedule with morning radio, you get up four in the morning. I can’t have that. Melatonin feels like you’re breaking through cellophane feeling that you get when you don’t get enough sleep. So it started with when I would come to you and I would get the, the dispensary grade gummies, those help me get such good sleep. And now I’ve just carried that on into the same dispensary grade gummies. I just buy them in Michigan instead

Dee Dee:
Of them better actually marijuana instead of camp <laugh>.

Laura Hardy:
Yeah. And so it’s like the, the, the ones I got, I was so thankful for Delta a and all of its existence in the state of Kentucky. And I’m so thankful that we were able to keep that. Yes. Thank you for your fight for that. Cuz I, I, one, I was in Texas last week, I did use Delta eight products while I was there because of the fact that they’re not a legal state and it’s, you know, and, and the Delta a stuff is great. Like it’s not a knock on that. It’s not that it’s not, you know, but it’s nice to be able to walk into a store, ask some questions, get what you need and not have to worry about being a criminal. Like when I leave there, I have my edibles in my car. If the cop pulls me over, I bought something at a store. Legally I have a receipt, I have a bag. I am not a criminal mm-hmm <affirmative> and I never thought I was a criminal. The times I would use marijuana before in a not legal state. It’s just, now my state recognizes that I’m doing something for what I need to do for me. And I’m not a criminal for doing it. And we’re not wasting tax money on chasing down people for stupid things that when we have real problems.

Dee Dee:
Yep.

Laura Hardy:
There’s, there’s so many real drugs out there in the sense of like things that are actually damaging lives and breaking up homes.

Dee Dee:
Mm-hmm <affirmative> <affirmative> including

Laura Hardy:
Hip is not the one it’s let’s let’s go after our, our let’s try to help people who are struggling with meth and heroin and, and pills and opioids and all this other stuff. Let’s help them get their lives back on the rails and stop bullying people who are using a plant medicinally and literally not harming a single person.

Dee Dee:
Yeah. They not got any problem Uhhuh

Laura Hardy:
They’re they’re helping taco bell continue to make money, leave them alone.

Dee Dee:
<laugh> <laugh>

Matt:
On that subject. Have you ridden a snow? Uh, what, what do they call those? The snowmobile snowmobiles. Yeah. Yeah,

Laura Hardy:
Not yet, but I did see one driving one next to the road one day, like a month or two ago. And I was like, what people do that for real? Um, but no, the, the roads here are like, like if you’re ever like maybe I would move to Michigan, but the snow is terrible. I’ve never seen a more efficient snow removal se system in my life. Like the second the snow hits the ground. It is off the pavement here. Like it snows, it’s cold. It’s on the sidewalks. It sucks. But I think I drive safer and better here than I ever did with a single dusting in Kentucky.

Dee Dee:
That’s awesome. That’s awesome. Mind

Laura Hardy:
Blowing. My boyfriend was just like, why are you so impressed by this? I’m like, I don’t know. It’s so cool. So,

Dee Dee:
You know,

Laura Hardy:
It’s, it’s that kind of stuff, but it’s, I, I, I miss Kentucky desperately. If Kentucky could get it together and figure it out, I would try to come back in a heartbeat cuz I do not like the cold winters. I, I miss, I miss my family. I miss my friends. But at this point in life between a great business op or a great career opportunity for me, cause I am working for an amazing radio company that I absolutely love. And I’m very thankful for this opportunity, but also just legal lead was a big thing that made me go it’s time to take sleep and, and leave home. You know, can’t

Dee Dee:
Say have blame you. I mean, I get it. We get it. Yeah, we totally get it. You guys were,

Laura Hardy:
I was the most brokenhearted to break into my bosses was like, bye you guys. I was like, I’m

Dee Dee:
Sorry. Y gonna, I know, I remember when you told me, I was like, are you really gonna leave us? You’re really leaving us. But I can’t. I mean, we can’t believe you girl. Mm-hmm

Laura Hardy:
No. And now you have a place to come visit when you wanna come see what it’s about when you wanna visit and, and procure wearers or try them and then, you know, get home after that.

Dee Dee:
Heck yeah. As long as you drive safely and don’t get pulled over, you know?

Matt:
Yeah. In late July.

Dee Dee:
Yeah. In late

Matt:
July in those two week, in that two week session where it’s above,

Laura Hardy:
Listen, it’s gonna be warm in like a week from now. They say, okay.

Dee Dee:
They say, I

Laura Hardy:
Don’t believe them yet, but we’ll see

Dee Dee:
We’re in the seventies. We’re in the seventies right now, Laura

Laura Hardy:
50 right now and rainy. Okay. Um, going to Texas was culture shock for me. Cause it was nice. And then I came back and I was like, oh yeah, I live in Michigan. I don’t get to go back to warm weather again. Great. Darn. And they said, this has actually been the coldest winter they’ve ever had in a while. So I’m like, oh of course the winter I move up here is your worst one in years. Thank you.

Dee Dee:
That’s great. Of course. Thanks. But you, you seem so happy. You seem so

Laura Hardy:
Genuinely. You really do life. Yeah. Good. It’s it’s been great. And you know, the industry up here, the legal industry’s great. It just, it’s nice to do something different and change, but it’s like, I’m, I’m thinking to y’all as you go through this fight and, and navigate all of this and I’m hoping that maybe we could see some sense because it’s the majority of Kentucky want it. It would be an amazing cash crop for the, the state because it’s like, it grows naturally. Like it is our plant. It was meant to be in Kentucky. And in all honesty between the opioids and, and the alcohol abuse problems that the, the state has. And, and I was affected, my mom was a raging alcoholic, drank herself to death, died of liver failure, that kind of stuff. Um, you know, I wish that she had had the opportunity to, to use hemp or marijuana products instead of alcohol. And maybe she would still be here with me today. Mm-hmm <affirmative>. And so that’s always the thing I think of is I wish more people could walk away. Not that you can’t enjoy alcohol and it not be negative. Not that you can’t enjoy certain things and it not be negative, but I wish people had better options when they need some sort of, you know, relaxation or relief that don’t turn into a long abuse or addiction or something bad down the line, you know?

Dee Dee:
Right. Agreed so sorry. You lost your mom to that too. Yeah.

Laura Hardy:
Cause

Dee Dee:
That’s tough.

Laura Hardy:
Yeah. And, and I think it’s, that’s what made me be an advocate and not want to deal with alcohol. You know, like I loved drinking bourbon. I loved doing mid jus at Derby, whatever. But you know, after experiencing and seeing what I’ve seen over, over my lifetime, it’s like, how can I be real excited about alcohol over time when I’ve watched people, I care about succumb to its possible capabilities. Mm-hmm, <affirmative> not that that’s gonna happen. Most people drink perfectly healthy and, and safe and fine, but it’s like, I don’t know of anybody. That’s marijuana themselves to death. Can’t name single person, you

Dee Dee:
Know?

Laura Hardy:
Right. So it’s like, why, why are we treating this? Like, it’s worse than the thing that you have at the gas station.

Dee Dee:
It very well said very well said, exactly.

Laura Hardy:
You can buy at Walmart. Why is it worse? You know, mm-hmm, <affirmative>, it’s silly.

Matt:
I look forward to the day when you can buy Walmart brand pre-roll

Laura Hardy:
Oh man. You know what, honestly, I hate the idea of it, but I’ll take it at this point. If that’s what it takes to get us there,

Matt:
Actually fuck it. I’m going to Costco. Cuz I wanna buy that shit in

Dee Dee:
Was bowl. I was gonna say, go to Costco. At least they’ll have organic back

Laura Hardy:
For $20 for some shit. And it’s just gonna be great. <laugh>

Dee Dee:
Non GMO weed man. Non GMO weed. <laugh> that’s well, and the big, the

Laura Hardy:
Big change here too, is that like obviously we have marijuana people on the air advertising, that kind of stuff, which is a little weird to hear when

Dee Dee:
You’re not. Oh I bet.

Laura Hardy:
But one of the, the very first, first, second week I came here, my big boss, like the guy that’s in charge of everybody, this building walked in and was like, do you smoke weed? And I remember pausing for a second and being like, this is a trap. If I answer this, I’m gonna get in trouble. And then remembering, no, I’m not. This is just like him asking if I wanna go for a beer after work. Like nothing here. There’s nothing here saying I can’t say yes. And I remember saying yes and feeling the relief of, I don’t have to hide part of my personality because of something arbitrary, stupid. Like I could be like, yeah, I consume marijuana here and there because it makes me less anxious and I’m happy to have that in my life. Mm-hmm <affirmative> and he didn’t judge me or think less of me.

Laura Hardy:
He’s like, okay, cool. You take so we can maybe, you know, if those clients come up, we could put you in front of those clients, that kind of thing. So it was kind of one of those situations where it’s like, that’s, that’s the culture shock difference of how it’s not just about being able to go in stores. It changes how your everyday life is. I don’t have to hide a, a shell of my person because I’m a bad person. Cause I do something that’s questionably legal. I’m doing a fully legal thing that brings me relief and makes me happy and makes me a more productive employee.

Dee Dee:
Man. Speaking of that, with this, with the radio stuff in the very, very beginning, Laura, I had to fight to have a radio ad. So they were very hesitant to even put hemp on the, on, on the radio here in Kentucky. I believe. So that was yeah. Back in 2018. My first one, I mean we had to kind of shop around and luckily it was your station. Um, and you were the head people there. Um, we started with 1 0 3 1 first, but yeah, there was a few places where’re like, no, we’re not doing that. We’re not doing that same thing for

Laura Hardy:
Commercials. I remember when you guys came on to queue, I remember it being really all of us, the building were like, wait, you can sell that on the radio. Mm-hmm <affirmative> like, all of us were a little shelter. We were like, yeah, we’ll take the money. We’re happy to advertise things like, you know, our radio is we we’ll happily get your message out there as long as we’re allowed to. We don’t judge. But yep. It was just mind blowing at that moment. And I had that same moment just a few weeks ago and my radio station isn’t generally the big Hemple and obviously right, cuz we’re a top 40 mom station, but we had a four 20 ad Aaron and it was like, come get your four 20 stuff. Bye weed. I’m just like, is this allowed to be settled on the radio and was like, oh yeah, you can.

Laura Hardy:
It’s just like saying go buy beer, go get your wine before the party. Like it is no different. And, and the, the mentality over time, I think people were a little hesitant to start from what I’ve been told. But like we, we did a phone conversation, a mom wrote it and said that she has her kids outside playing, um, during the day and her next door neighbors sometimes will smoke marijuana outside. And she was wondering if she should ask them not to do it when the kids were outside. And we thought the audience would be pretty divided that people would say, yeah, you can ask their no, leave them alone. There wasn’t a single person that called in that morning that didn’t say leave those nice people alone. They could smoke whatever they want.

Dee Dee:
Oh wow. But

Laura Hardy:
That was the full consensus of everyone. And I was just like, it is amazing how quick the, the attitude changes once people are educated and understand like it’s no big deal. Yep. And I can’t wait for like, dear God, hopefully less than 10 years from now when I’m seeing the same thing happen in my home state and watching people. I know I’m, I’m, I’m rooting for you guys, whether it comes national first or whether Kentucky finally figures it out. Cause I know there’s some good hearted, good people there in charge, at least in some spots mm-hmm <affirmative> and I’m hoping they could prevail over the idiots who are just making everyone’s life harder and losing money, hand over fist for the state who desperately needs it.

Dee Dee:
Mm-hmm <affirmative> agreed. Agreed. We we’ll see, man. Lord, thank you so much for joining us and we miss you and yes, we, I feel a road trip coming on to Michigan. That’d be a lot of fun summer in August. When

Laura Hardy:
It in town I will come see you and I’ll yes, I will. Will not bring you things obviously, cuz

Dee Dee:
That obviously not feel loud.

Laura Hardy:
So

Matt:
When you, when you find your car keys,

Dee Dee:
Yeah. It’s

Laura Hardy:
Not allowed to come back to Kentucky

Matt:
When come visit the car

Laura Hardy:
Keys.

Dee Dee:
You’re so awesome. We miss you and we’re so we’re so glad you’re doing well up there and enjoying a legal state, um, unlike Kentucky here. So, um, hopefully, you know, people can learn that, you know, it’s not a bad thing. Cannabis is good.

Laura Hardy:
Yeah. And if you ever wanna ask me questions about living in a legal state, uh, Laura Hardy radio is my handle on everything. Send me a message. I’d be happy to talk to you about it, about it. And if you want, if you wanna really experience it for yourself, I highly recommend this summer. Take a trip up here to Michigan, get yourself an Airbnb, come check out grand rapids and our stuff. Heck you can go right to, if you go to south bend and head right across the state line right there in Kalamazoo, they’ve got a really neat place that is 24 7 dispensary. You can go at any time of the day, night. Doesn’t matter. They’re always open every holiday. Everything.

Dee Dee:
Yeah. Wow. That is freaking incredible. Is it next

Matt:
To a waffle house?

Dee Dee:
<laugh> waffle house. It

Laura Hardy:
Basically is

Dee Dee:
<laugh>

Laura Hardy:
Town. I like it there a lot. It’s near the ocean. So not the ocean, the lake, but it feels like

Dee Dee:
An it’s the ocean up there. Yeah.

Laura Hardy:
It’s it might as well be. You can’t tell the difference between the Gulf of Mexico and lake Michigan really cannot.

Dee Dee:
That’s that was pretty cool.

Matt:
Oh, I question <laugh>

Dee Dee:
Well

Laura Hardy:
The cold, the coldness this time of year. Yes. But in the summer you cannot tell the difference. <laugh>

Dee Dee:
Very cool, Laura. Thank you so much for joining us. It was so good to see your face and uh, hopefully we will see you soon for sure. Thank you so much. And Hey everybody that was listening to us, definitely leave a message. Um, send us your thoughts. Um, share our podcast and you know, hopefully maybe we can keep, you know, changing people’s minds and breaking those stigmas about cannabis and how much it helps people. Maybe stop the opiate addiction, crisis epidemic, whatever you wanna call it. You know, let’s focus on things that, um, actually help people and let’s get some stuff legalized here in Kentucky and uh, for now though, let’s keep it hippy out there.

Matt:
Bye.

Dee Dee:
Thanks for joining us for another episode of hemp and happiness with the hemp

Matt:
Queen and Emper

Dee Dee:
Keep your mind ever open and expanding, like subscribe, review, follow us all

Speaker 4:
The good stuff and keep it. He there.

 

Guests

Laura Hardy

Creative radio personality with multiple prior management positions in fashion retail, food, and radio. Strong communication skills, strong work ethic, and digital creative skills with an emphasis in excellent customer and employee satisfaction. Proud team player, and creative problem solver.